Biotoxins - Seafood & Water- Research

Research Area #1 | Seafood & Water > Biotoxins

Biotoxins are a severe problem in the Eastern Pacific region and include Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning or PSP and domoic acid poisoning. Biotoxins are produced by algae and accumulate in shellfish when they filter feed. Human illness or death follows ingestion of tainted shellfish. In addition, biotoxins can have sublethal effects, such as short-term memory loss caused by domoic acid poisoning. Biotoxins are also responsible for many shellfish harvest closings and large economic losses in coastal regions.

 

Research Projects (2004-2009)

  • Develop new sensors and protocols for in situ detection of phytoplankton to improve understanding of community dynamics that lead to harmful algal blooms and to help develop an early warning capability.
  • Improve understanding of shellfish resistance and tolerance to toxins to "type" shellfish and classify their tendency to retain or release toxins.

Researchers

Principal Investigator:
Dr. Vera Trainer, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Key External Collaborators:
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Dr. Ger van den Engh, Institute for Systems Biology
Dr. Edward Miles, University of Washington
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Dr. Nate Mantua, University of Washington

Northwest Fisheries Science Center Researchers:
Dr. Kathi Lefebvre

 

Links

Northwest Fisheries Science Center Harmful Algal Bloom Program
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom Partnership (ORHAB)
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Pacific Northwest (ECOHAB)
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Institute for Systems Biology