Pathogens - Seafood & Water- Research

Research Area #1 | Seafood & Water > Pathogens

In the U.S., there are approximately 25,000 cases of foodborne disease that require hospitalization every year. Waterborne bacterial pathogens may be the cause of as many as half of these cases.

The majority of seafood-related bacterial infections in humans are due to Vibrio species, bacteria that can cause severe gastroenteritis in healthy individuals who consume affected shellfish. At least one Vibrio species (vulnificus) is responsible for mortalities of certain susceptible individuals. Mortalities associated with Vibrio parahaemolyticus while rare, have occurred.

 

Research Projects (2004-2009)

  • Identify the mechanisms through which V. parahaemolyticus (responsible for the majority of seafood-related bacterial infections in humans) colonizes shellfish and develop methods to reduce or eliminate this pathogen from harvested shellfish.
  • Determine the association of harmful bacteria (Vibrio species) with marine phytoplankton to develop better tools to assess health risk at shellfish harvesting times.
  • Develop a better understanding of complex microbial communities in the marine environment, possibly leading to improved methods to reduce or eliminate these communities.

Researchers

Principal Investigator:
Dr. Mark Strom, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Key External Collaborator:
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Dr. Stephen Moseley, University of Washington

Northwest Fisheries Science Center Researchers:
Dr. William Nilsson
Dr. Rohinee Paranjpye

 

Links

Northwest Fisheries Science Center's Microbiology Program
The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site University of Washington Department of Microbiology