Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Chris Harvey - Staff Profile

Division:
CB
Status:
Federal, NOAA Fisheries
Job Title:
Supervisory Research Fish Biologist
Phone:
206-860-3228
Email:

Chris  Harvey
 
Programs:
 

Background

Chris Harvey has been at the NWFSC since 2001 and joined the CB division in 2009, where he leads the Integrative Marine Ecology Team. He received a B.S. in biology from Wake Forest University, an M.S. in fisheries from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in limnology and marine science from the University of Wisconsin. Prior to coming to the NWFSC, Chris studied aquatic community structure in southwest Alaska, the Arctic, the Great Lakes, and the Baltic Sea.

Current Research

Chris's main research interest is the development of science tools and products to support ecosystem-based management of marine resources, activities and services. Chris is one of the science leads of the California Current Integrated Ecosystem Assessment (IEA), a team of scientists mostly based at the Northwest and Southwest Fisheries Science Centers. The California Current IEA team generates information on key ecosystem components and processes, and communicates that information to end users such as the Pacific Fishery Management Council, NOAA Fisheries Western Regional Office, and the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries for use in management and policy development. Information is available at https://www.integratedecosystemassessment.noaa.gov/regions/california-current.

 

Chris's related research interests include: use of ecosystem-scale models to describe dynamics of marine systems, particularly the Salish Sea and the California Current; predator-prey interactions; bioenergetics of fishes and other marine consumers; and population dynamics of species of conservation or fisheries importance. In particular, Chris is studying how ecosystems are affected by large-scale perturbations, including climate change and variability, changes in ocean biogeochemistry, shifts in food web structure, and various human activities. These projects involve collaboration with many state, federal and university scientists.