Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Newportal Blog

A gateway to oceanographic adventures from the Newport Line and beyond

map showing Newport line We are a group of NOAA Fisheries and The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Oregon State University scientists that sample the Newport Line fortnightly to understand changing ocean conditions.

Follow us as we share the fun things we learn about this region and other areas of the North Pacific Ocean.

These plots display the most recent oceanographic data collected off Newport, Oregon. Scroll through these plots to see how quickly the ocean can change! Learn more about these plots and our research program.
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Data above are from 50 m water depth from a station located 5 miles off Newport, OR. Dashed lines are the summer (blue) and winter (red) averages from 1996 - present. (Click chart to enlarge)

Blog Entries for March 2018

First Survey of 2018

By Samantha Zeman
Posted on March 6, 2018

We've just returned from a 6-day trip aboard the R/V Bell M. Shimada. We had a rough go of it, with 40-kt winds and 16-20 foot swells that hampered our sampling and sleeping efforts. Despite the weather, we sailed to down to Crescent City and managed to hit most of our important stations, including sampling 200 nm out on the Newport Line. It was never a dull moment with a variety of projects happening day and night. Scientists were monitoring HABs along transects, observing marine mammals, and trawling for commercially important fishes. And of course, CTD casts and plankton tows.

The ocean was well-mixed at most stations because of the winter storms. Pyrosomes were collected at offshore stations, greater than 15 nm, from Crescent City to Newport.

The dark and the light. Frontal zone over the Bell M.Shimada.
Deploying the CTD (left) and monitoring the live data stream in the lab (right). Watching the data allows us to monitor trends and anomalies as we move from station to station. 
Jason with a Big Skate (Raja binoculata) caught in the beam trawl. Scientists meticulously looking through a bottom trawl catch. It takes a trained eye to find the juvenile fish amongst the pyrosomes and shrimp.
Deploying the bongo net (top). Emptying the bongo codend full of large pyrosomes at one of the offshore stations. 

Tagged: NCC, NH Line

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