U.S. Dept Commerce/NOAA/NMFS/NWFSC/Publications



NOAA logo


NWFSC/NMFS identifier/logo


FROZEN STORAGE STABILITY OF FILLETS,

MINCE, AND MIXED BLOCKS PREPARED FROM

UNFROZEN AND PREVIOUSLY FROZEN PINK SALMON

(ONCHORHYNCHUS GORBUSCHA)


K. D. Reppond and J. K. Babbitt



Kodiak Investigations-Utilization Research Division
National Marine Fisheries Service
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
900 Trident Way
Kodiak, AK 99615

March 1995

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Ronald H. Brown, Secretary

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
D. James Baker, Administrator

National Marine Fisheries Service
Rolland A. Schmitten, Assistant Administrator for Fisheries


ABSTRACT

Pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) is the most abundant species of salmon in Alaska and is mostly processed by canning. Processing of pink salmon into other forms will be necessary to maintain profitability. The objectives of this experiment were to investigate the processing of pink salmon into boneless fillets and mince and to determine changes in quality during frozen storage.

Blocks containing fillets, mechanically deboned mince, or mixtures of fillets and mince were made from unfrozen fish and stored at -18°C. Blocks were also made from salmon that had been stored as headed and gutted (H&G) fish for 3, 6, or 12 months. The blocks were subjected to chemical and sensory analysis as well as thaw drip and mechanical textural testing.

Minced pink salmon alone or in combination with boneless fillets made acceptable product forms. Use of minced salmon increased the yield of edible product by one-third. These product forms were also produced from previously frozen fish, although thaw drip increased as the total time in frozen storage approached 12 months. Desirability scores tended to be higher for blocks made from unfrozen fish than for blocks made from previously frozen fish and higher for blocks with 0% or 25% mince than for blocks with 50% or 100% mince. Loss of quality during frozen storage as determined by sensory analysis was generally lower for blocks of fillets and for blocks made from unfrozen fish than for blocks made from frozen fish. One exception was chewiness, which tended to increase more for blocks made from unfrozen fish than for blocks made from frozen fish. Changes in color and rancidity values were small. Mechanical textural analysis agreed with the trends seen in the sensory results.

Recovery of edible flesh from pink salmon by use of mechanical flesh separators is technically feasible and could boost yields from landed product. Acceptable product forms using minced pink salmon by itself or in combination with boneless fillets is possible. Products made from previously frozen H&G fish were somewhat less desirable than products made from unfrozen fish but were still acceptable.


CONTENTS

Introduction

Materials and Methods

Results and Discussion
  • Yield
  • Chemical analysis
  • Thaw drip
  • Hunter color
  • Sensory analysis
  • Correlations
  • Effects of frozen storage
  • Mechanical texture test
  • Conclusions

    Citations

    Tables

    Figure

    Appendix


    Hardcopies of NOAA Technical Memoranda are available from:

    Paper copies vary in price