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NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NWFSC-31

Commercial Fisheries Data Collection Procedures for U.S. Pacific Coast Groundfish


David B. Sampson and Paul R. Crone* (editors)


Oregon State University, Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station and
Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Hatfield Marine Science Center
2030 S. Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365, USA


*National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service
Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Analysis and Monitoring Division
Hatfield Marine Science Center
2030 S. Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR 97365, USA

September 1997

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
William M. Daley, Secretary


National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

D. James Baker, Administrator


National Marine Fisheries Service
Rolland A. Schmitten, Assistant Administrator for Fisheries


This document should be cited as follows:
Sampson, D.B., and P.R. Crone. 1997. Commercial Fisheries Data Collection Procedures for U.S. Pacific Coast Groundfish. NOAA Tech. Memo. NMRS-NWFSC-31, 189 p.

Paper copies of this report may be available for a fee from:
National Technical Information Service
5285 Port Royal Road
Springfield, VA 22161
1-800-553-6847
orders@ntis.fedworld.gov


CONTENTS

Preface

Chapter 1 Introduction

	1.1	Motivation for This Document
	1.2	Historical Perspective
	1.3	Overview
	1.4	Acknowledgments
	1.5	Citations
Chapter 2 - Groundfish Data Collection in Washington
	2.1	Introduction
	2.1.1	Geographical Overview
			Major ports
			Major fishing grounds and principal species landed
			Port samplers
	2.1.2	History of Data Collection Systems
	2.1.3	Legal Authority to Collect Data
			Obligations of fishers
			Noncompliance
	2.2	Fish Ticket/Landing Receipt System
	2.2.1	Market Categories
	2.2.2	Processing System
	2.3	Logbook System
	2.3.1	Groundfish Trawl
			Collection
			Data entry
			Error checking
	2.4	Species-Composition Sampling
	2.4.1	A Hypothetical Example
	2.5	Biological Sampling
	2.6	Estimating Derived Quantities
	2.6.1	Trawl Catch and Effort: Point Estimates
			Tow-expanded values
			Distributed values
			Rockfish species catch through 1992
	2.6.2	Trawl Catch and Effort: Variance Estimates
			Tow-expanded values
			Distributed values
			Rockfish species catch through 1992
	2.6.3	Non-Trawl Catch and Effort
	2.6.4	Catch-at-Age
	2.6.5	Relation to PacFIN
	2.7	Acknowledgments
	2.8	Citations
Chapter 3 - Groundfish Data Collection in Oregon
	3.1	Introduction
	3.1.1	Geographical Overview
			Major ports
			Major fishing grounds
			Principal species landed
			Port biologists and field staff
	3.1.2	History of Data Collection Systems
	3.1.3	Legal Authority to Collect Data
			Obligations of fishers
			Noncompliance
	3.2	Fish Ticket/Landing Receipt System
	3.2.1	Market Categories
	3.2.2	Processing System
			Data entry and error checking
			Data processing in Portland
	3.2.3	Groundfish Landings Not Covered by the Fish Ticket System
	3.3	Logbook System
	3.3.1	Groundfish Trawl
			Collection
			Data entry and error checking
	3.3.2	Other Gears
	3.4	Species-Composition Sampling
	3.4.1	Sampling Protocol
	3.4.2	A Hypothetical Example
	3.4.3	Processing System
			Data entry and error checking
			Sampling coverage of the fishery
	3.5	Biological Sampling
	3.5.1	Sampling Protocol
	3.5.2	Age Determination Methods
	3.5.3	Processing System
			Data entry and error checking
			Sampling coverage of the fishery
	3.6	Estimating Derived Quantities
	3.6.1	Landings by Area
	3.6.2	Rockfish Landings by Species
	3.6.3	Catch-at-Age
	3.6.4	Other Estimates
	3.7	Acknowledgments
	3.8	Citations
Chapter 4 - Groundfish Data Collection in California
	4.1	Introduction
	4.1.1	Geographical Overview
			Major ports
			Major fishing grounds
			Principal species landed
			Port biologist locations
	4.1.2	History of Data Collection Systems
			Documentation
	4.1.3	Legal Authority to Collect Data
			Obligations of fishers
			Noncompliance
	4.2	Fish Ticket/Landing Receipt System
	4.2.1	Market Categories
	4.2.2	Processing System
	4.2.3	Groundfish Landings Not Covered by the Landing Receipt System
	4.3	Logbook System
	4.3.1	Groundfish Trawl
			Collection
			Data entry and error checking
	4.3.2	Other Gears
	4.4	Species-Composition Sampling
	4.4.1	Sampling Protocol
	4.4.2	A Hypothetical Example
	4.4.3	Processing System
	4.5	Biological Sampling
	4.5.1	Sampling Protocol
			Rockfish
			Dover sole
	4.5.2	Processing System
	4.6	Estimating Derived Quantities
	4.6.1	Landings by Area
	4.6.2	Annual Estimates
			Rockfish
			Dover sole
	4.6.3	Monthly Estimates to PacFIN
	4.7	Acknowledgments
	4.8	Citations
Chapter 5 - State/Federal Groundfish Sampling Programs
	5.1	Introduction
	5.2	Sablefish
	5.3	Lingcod
	5.4	Pacific Hake
	5.5	Acknowledgments
	5.6	Citations
Chapter 6 - Pacific Fisheries Information Network
	6.1	Introduction
	6.2	PacFIN System, 1981-87
	6.2.1	Groundfish Data Collected by State Fishery Departments
	6.2.2	Other Data
	6.3	PacFIN System After 1987
	6.3.1	Redefinition Project - Specification
	6.3.2	Redefinition Project - Development
	6.3.3	Vessel Summaries Subsystem
	6.3.4	Transition to UNIX/Oracle Computing Environment
	6.3.5	Limited-Entry Permit Subsystem
	6.4	Current PacFIN System
	6.4.1	Overall Data Flow
	6.4.2	PacFIN Database Tables
			Code list tables
			Fish ticket tables
			Proportion tables
			Summary tables
			Other tables
	6.4.3	Central Processing - Update
	6.4.4	Central Processing - Retrieval
	6.4.5	Data Completeness
	6.4.6	Confidentiality of Data
	6.5	Acknowledgments
	6.6	Citation
Chapter 7 - Comparison of the Washington, Oregon, and California Groundfish Data Systems and Discussion of Potential for Improvements
	7.1	Introduction
	7.2	Similarities and Differences Among the State Systems
	7.3	Logistical Constraints
	7.4	Opportunities for Standardization
	7.5	Other Opportunities to Improve the System or Increase Efficiency
	7.6	Recommendations
	7.7	Acknowledgments
	7.8	Citations
Appendix A - Examples of fish tickets used in Washington, Oregon, and California
Figure A-1 / Figure A-2 / Figure A-3 / Figure A-4 /

Appendix B - List of common and scientific names for species of fish included in this document


PREFACE

The Pacific Groundfish Statistics Working Group convened for the first time in June 1992 in Seattle, with the primary objective of reviewing the data collection and processing procedures used to monitor commercial groundfish landings in Washington, Oregon, and California. At this meeting, the Group unanimously agreed that complete documentation of these procedures was long overdue and decided to embrace the daunting task of assembling the material that appears in this Technical Memorandum.

Earlier attempts at documenting data collection systems for U.S. Pacific coast groundfish fisheries resulted in rather general and superficial descriptions of the monitoring programs. This was primarily due to the very complex nature of the systems, in which the scope and intricacies of the data collection programs used in the three states had evolved largely independently. At the outset, the Group recognized that considerable attention, planning, and logistical and financial support would be needed to complete this Technical Memorandum. We thank all of the members of the Group for preparing their respective chapters in a timely fashion and for addressing the recommendations made by the editors.

We thank Stan Allen of the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission and Rick Methot of the National Marine Fisheries Service (Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Analysis and Monitoring Division) for financial support, without which this document would never have been completed. We thank Julianne Pagel of the Publications Unit of the National Marine Fisheries Service (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) and Tonya Builder of the National Marine Fisheries Service (Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fishery Analysis and Monitoring Division) for reviewing drafts of this report and for editorial suggestions that greatly improved the final version. Finally, we thank Alec MacCall of the National Marine Fisheries Service (Southwest Fisheries Science Center, Tiburon Laboratory) for encouraging us to undertake this task and to publish this Technical Memorandum.

To all who were involved, thanks for your perseverance and patience.

David B. Sampson

Paul R. Crone