Northwest Fisheries Science Center

Marine Microbes and Toxins Research Activities

Marine Microbes and Toxins Research Topics

Staff

Dr. Linda Rhodes
Program Manager
Staff Directory


Environmental Microbiology

Microbes, such as bacteria and phytoplankton, have an important role in marine ecosystem responses to anthropogenic impacts, rhythmic weather patterns, and climate change. As the greatest biomass in the oceans, microbes influence biogeochemical processes and food webs. In streams and creeks, microbes can modify water quality by removing excess nutrients and degrade some contaminants.

One project assesses the relationship of microbes in the nearshore pelagic food web of the Salish Sea. Monthly data collected from over 75 sites (see map to right) between April and October included vertical profiles of physical features (e.g., temperature, salinity, pH, dissolved oxygen), inorganic nutrient concentration, microbial community and abundance, and abundance of fish and jellyfish assemblages. This work conducted in collaboration with the Watershed Program.

Another project evaluates the microbes and macroinvertebrates of the hyporheic zone for evidence of stream restoration efforts in urban creeks such as The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site Thornton Creek in Seattle. This work is conducted in collaboration with the Watershed Program, the The next link/button will exit from NWFSC web site US Fish & Wildlife Service, and Seattle Public Utilities.

Recent Publications

Project Staff

Linda Rhodes, Anne Baxter, Correigh Greene, Casey Rice, Jason Hall, Josh Chamberlin
Click for larger image. Abundance of a fecal bacterial indicator (Bacteroidales) by source (human or ruminant) in subtidal waters from an April sampling.